External examinations

Posted by Garry Collins, AATE President on 5 June 2015

In response to a letter that had appeared the previous day, the following letter was submitted to The Courier-Mail for possible publication on Friday 5 June 2015. Two letters on the topic were printed but mine was not selected.

Balance needed in schooling

Anita Bailey (Letters, June 4) is misguided to suggest that schooling should be solely concerned with the transmission of a prescribed set of knowledge and that external exams are the only worthwhile form of educational assessment.

Sensible schooling needs to provide students with both knowledge and skills; neither on its own can properly equip students for the future.

Bailey also overstates the case in relation to Queensland's system of school-based assessment. While some aspects of the current system at senior level need reform, that does not mean that a complete return to an external examination regime is the appropriate response. Even the ACER review team did not recommend that.

If external examinations are the only acceptable form of educational assessment, it needs to be asked why universities are not subject to such a system.

Garry Collins
President, Australian Association for the Teaching of English

Posted in: Assessment   0 Comments

Educational red tape

Posted by Garry Collins, ETAQ Immediate Past President on 9 May 2015

The Courier-Mail of Thursday 7 May 2015 carried, on Page 13, a story that reported that $17 million was being provided to AITSL (Australian Institute of Teaching and School Leadership) to fund:

  • mandatory literacy and numeracy tests for teaching graduates
  • an overhaul of practice teaching requirements
  • development of subject specialisations for primary teacher graduates
  • audits of teacher education programs

The following letter was submitted in response with the hope that it would appear on Saturday 9 May. Unfortunately, it was not selected for publication.

Spending education funds wisely

You report that the side of politics that claims to believe in small government is to spend $17 million on new bureaucratic measures supposedly aimed at improving teacher quality ("Unis facing testing for teachers", May 7).

Most beginning teachers already start work in schools on short-term contracts and all have to spend at least a year on probation before being eligible for full registration. This provides adequate opportunities for any who are not up to standard to be weeded out. With the sort of costly and unnecessary measures reported, it is difficult to see the federal government as serious about balancing the budget.

Minister Pyne is quoted as saying that it's not possible to provide first-rate education without first-rate teachers. That doesn't mean that every idea about improving school education is a good one.

It could equally be said that it's not possible to have first-rate government without first-rate politicians. Unfortunately, it seems that the country has to make do with the likes of Mr Pyne instead.

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Religion in education

Posted by Garry Collins, ETAQ Immediate Past President on 6 May 2015

Members interested in the topic of religion in education might be interested in the conference outlined below. John Carr, one of the convenors, is a former president of ETAQ.

SoFiA, the name of the organization, = Sea of Faith in Australia. Though not at all religious myself, I will be attending and conducting a workshop on NAPLAN and My School.

Garry Collins, ETAQ Immediate Past President

SoFiA Conference: Religion in Education

A conference exploring issues relating to the role of religion in education in Australia will be held at Twin Towns, Coolangatta, 22 to 24 May 2015. Religion, unfortunately, is becoming an increasingly divisive force in Australian life.

Everyone agrees with the adage 'Education is the answer' but the educational role played by religions and their many denominations, being sectarian, is sometimes part of the problem. What most Australian children and young people lack is access to wider, more objective courses on religion and religions.

For more information, see http://www.sof-in-australia.org/ or contact: johncarr@ozemail.com.au

Posted in: General news   0 Comments

External assessment

Posted by Garry Collins, ETAQ Immediate Past President on 6 May 2015

An edited version of the letter below was published in The Courier-Mail on Tuesday 5 May 2015. It was part of a sequence with a previous letter shown below. Underlined words were deleted and bracketed ones inserted. The paper's heading was "Key point missed". The letter was printed in a side bar and the paper formatted it as a single paragraph.

External exams not the answer

Tempe Harvey (Letters, May 4) agrees with my observation (me) (Letters, May 2) that NAPLAN tests probe only a narrow slice of the school curriculum.  Unfortunately, she seems to have missed the key point.

In addition to the important "value adding" issue that David Gillespie explained in his opinion piece of May 1, this is what makes NAPLAN averages an unsuitable basis for assessing whole school quality. A major problem with NAPLAN is that people are encouraged to read too much into the results.

I also wish to dissociate myself from Harvey's call for external exams to replace the OP system. This expensive expedient would not be the best use of scarce funds for education. And it is hard to see what the Year 12 assessment regime has to do with standardized testing for Years 3, 5, 7 and 9.

Garry Collins

Posted in: Assessment   0 Comments

School autonomy

Posted by Garry Collins, ETAQ Immediate Past President on 2 May 2015

The following letter was submitted for inclusion in The Australian on 30 April 2015 but it was not selected for publication.

Christopher's Pyne's pillars of schooling

I wonder does Education Minister Christopher Pyne realize that there is a logical contradiction between two of the federal government's policy pillars relating to the nation's schools ("Four pillars for education", 29/4).

The first pillar calls for a "robust" curriculum. What Pyne doesn't say in his piece in yesterday's edition is that it is not envisaged that schools will have any autonomy about what curriculum they teach.

At the same time, he claims that greater autonomy in governance and administration will improve educational outcomes. What a flexible thing school autonomy apparently is.

Pyne suggests that his push for greater school autonomy is supported by research. Fair minded people familiar with the research literature would see this as an overstatement bordering on a fib.

Posted in: General news   3 Comments

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English Educator of the week

Rachael Christopherson
Brisbane Girls Grammar School

Number of years teaching:
25.  12 years at BGGS

Where else have you taught?
St Edmund's College, Ipswich (all boys)
Mt Alvernia College, Kedron (all girls)
Downlands College, Toowoomba (co-ed boarding with Ag Studies programme)

 

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